Mistakes that mean landlords lose right to break-up

Landlords looking to terminate a lease have received a blunt reminder of what it takes to serve a valid break notice after a legal battle reached the High Court.

The ruling in Vanquish Properties (UK) Limited Partnership –v- Brook Street (UK) Limited centred around premises ear-marked for development on Fenchurch Street in London.

The premises were let to Brook Street by the City Corporation as freeholder, with a break clause in September 2016 on six months’ notice. When developer Vanquish came along, they were granted an overriding lease, so they would become Brook Street’s direct landlord. But when Brook Street were given notice to terminate the lease under the break clause, the paperwork said that it was served on behalf of “Vanquish Properties (UK) Limited Partnership, the landlord of the property.”

Brook Street argued the notice was not valid because a limited partnership has no legal existence and cannot hold property, so Vanquish Properties (UK) Limited Partnership could not be the landlord.

They also argued that the lease could not be held by the individual partners of the limited partnership, as s.34 of the Law of Property Act 1925 stipulates that land cannot be transferred to more than four people, but Vanquish had five partners and no partners were specifically named in any of the papers.

The High Court agreed with Brook Street that the lease could not have vested in the Limited Partnership or in some combination of its partners; the overriding lease had never been properly granted, so Vanquish could not have given valid notice.

Explained Commercial Property legal expert, Roderick Campbell of Hart Brown Solicitors in Guildford: “This case highlights something that was faulty from the outset, with the drafting of the overriding lease setting the scene for the resulting problems. It reinforces how important it is to make sure all contractual requirements are checked, and double checked, whether it’s when a landlord wants to serve a valid notice to break a lease, or at any other stage.

“Unlike a limited company or a limited liability partnership, a limited partnership is not a legal entity in its own right, which is why it cannot hold a lease. In recent years, limited partnership structures have become increasingly common in property investment, but everyone involved needs to make sure they understand the implications of whatever ownership or business structure they adopt.”

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Roderick Campbell

Partner, Head of Commercial Property

Rod joined Hart Brown as a trainee in 1983, qualified in 1985 and became a partner in 1988. Rod has specialised in property law for...

Partner, Head of Commercial Property

Roderick Campbell

Rod joined Hart Brown as a trainee in 1983, qualified in 1985 and became a partner in 1988.

Rod has specialised in property law for over 20 years concentrating on commercial property for the last 7 years. He handles a broad range of commercial transactions for both businesses and individuals. He has developed a particular expertise in dealing with restrictive covenants, options, conditional contracts and overage.

He is a member of the Law Society Property Group, the LawNet Commercial Property Group and Mensa. In order to further enhance his knowledge and skills in 2007 Rod took on the arduous task of studying for, and passing with Distinction, an LL.M Masters Degree in Advanced Commercial Property Law through Northumbria University. He achieved the highest combined score with his first 4 assignments and was awarded top prize by Butterworths/Lexis Nexis.

In 2008 he published a book on “Methods of Securing Development Land Overage”.

Roderick’s clients regularly describe him as “very good to deal with”, “clear, direct, straightforward, efficient and effective.” Another client commented: "Roderick Campbell provided extremely helpful, insightful, and totally professional advice. He was much more useful than other solicitors involved in the transaction."

His most memorable case was an Option Agreement concerning an M25 service area which lasted for some 12 years.